Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt
Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt
Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt
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Monroe Carell Jr.
Children's Hospital
at Vanderbilt
2200 Children's Way
Nashville, TN 37232


(615) 936-1000

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Home / Guide for Families and Visitors / About Us / Office of Inclusion and Health Equity / Clinical Patient Communication Strategies: LGBT and Gender Nonconforming Population
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Clinical Patient Communication Strategies: LGBT and Gender Nonconforming Population
 

Many of us observed the horrific events of the mass shooting in Orlando, Florida unfold in June 2016. In the wake of the worst mass shooting in U.S. history, we need to recognize how this violence has uniquely touched our lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex life (LGBTQI), gender nonconforming (GNC), different sex-development (DSD) community. It is important that we unite as one community and show support.

In an address, President Obama stated, “While the violence could have hit any American community, this is an especially heartbreaking day for our friends who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender.”

As physicians and health care professionals, we do an extraordinary job of applying our expertise in the healing and treatment of many different vulnerable populations. The Office of Inclusion and Health Equity (OIHE) stands in support of your personal efforts to provide the highest quality of care.

We encourage you to further enrich and educate yourselves when interacting with our LGBTQI, GNC, and DSD patients and families. The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Office for Diversity and Inclusion developed and are making available to you a series of vignettes designed to analyze clinician-patient communication. According to the AAMC, these vignettes can be used in a variety of ways (for example, small, large group or individual study).

Assessing Bullying in Developmental History: A clinician assesses the impact of childhood bullying on the emotional development of his adult patient.

Assessing Family and Developmental History: A clinician and patient discuss the patient’s father coming out during the patient's youth and the impact this had on her family.

Assessing Minority Stress and Risk Behaviors: A clinician assesses the impact instances of discrimination and stigma on a patient.

Ineffective History Taking: Viewers are given an example of ineffective medical history. The clinician makes assumptions about his patient’s anatomy, leading him to ask questions that are not relevant to his patient’s medical history or health. The vignette concludes with the clinician apologizing to the patient and modeling behavior that would be useful for clinicians who find themselves in similar circumstances.

Vanderbilt Program for LGBTI Health-Vanderbilt School of Medicine

Jennifer L. Najjar M.D., Gender/DSD Clinic

Arie L. Nettles, Ph.D.
Director, Office of Inclusion & Health Equity
(615) 343-0080


Last Edited: July 7, 2016
Valued Participant of Vanderbilt Health Affiliated Network